Bendigo Street Milk Bar, Richmond

When I hear the word “milk bar”, it congers up images of a small corner store filled with the essential grocery items and display windows filled with lollies and candy. As a child I would buy a 20cent bag of mixed lollies and it would last me all day. But this milk bar is different.

I was happy to hear that the Bendigo street milk bar was still alive and operating. Many years ago, my mum and auntie used to work a couple of streets down and used to frequent it for lunch. During school holidays, my brother used to work with my mum for a few weeks. My auntie will call their lunch orders ahead and would send my brother down to pick it up. He has fond memories of his regular egg and bacon rolls :)

I had the opportunity to head down with my Little Man for brunch. I was met with friendly staff who were more than happy to help me with the menu.

I started off with a latte and my Little man had a babycino complete with marshmallows.

Since the Little man already had breakfast, he really wanted the brownie that was on display. It was dense and fudgy. So good.

I had the warm breakfast salad. It had salad leaves, bacon, tomatoes, shaved Parmesan, avocado and a poached egg with a lemon and olive oil dressing. It was tasty, fresh and something I can eat over and over again.

They have an outside courtyard, which is accessible through a small hall way to the back door of the cafe. A family were happily eating and chatting away.

I will definitely like to return and try their lunch menu. Their display case of different sandwiches and their specials board menu sounded amazing. The staff were super friendly and the place felt comfortable where you can just sit and have a cup of coffee as the world skipped by.

The Little man and I enjoyed our complimentary meal courtesy of 360 Immerse Agency and Bendigo Street Milk Bar.

Bendigo Street Milk Bar on Urbanspoon

Bon Appetite,

Cherrie

 

Kedgeree with Kippers

Don't you love breakfast for dinner? Kedgeree, which usually contains cooked smoked fish, rice, eggs and curry, is known to be eaten for breakfast throughout the UK.

It is believed that the British soldiers brought it back home after enjoying eating it in India. It is now a popular breakfast meal using left over smoked fish though it can be eaten any time of the day.

I was really happy when I found this at a local fish monger. It's kippers. Kippers are smoked herring that has been split, salted or pickled and cold smoked. It reminds me of the Filipino smoked fish, tinapa. If you can't find kippers, you can use any smoked fish you like or even just used poached salmon.

I knew I wanted to make kedgeree as soon as I saw the kippers. I made it for dinner and my English hubby loved it. It now makes the dinner table often. For this recipe, I used a few different recipes I had and combined it to make my own.

Recipe: (serves 4)

  • 20g butter
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 2 tbs curry powder
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric powder
  • 350g basmati rice
  • 600ml chicken stock
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 4 hard boiled eggs, quartered
  • 200g kippers
  • 1 tbs lemon juice
  • Handful of parsley leaves
  • Salt and pepper

 

  1. Melt the butter in a heavy based pan, add the onion and garlic. Sauté for 5 minutes
  2. Add the curry and turmeric powder and cook for a further minute.
  3. Add the rice and stir to mix. Add the stock and bay leaves. Bring to the boil and let simmer for 10-12 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, boil the kippers according to packet instructions then flake gently.
  5. Uncover the rice and gently fork the kippers and boiled eggs through.
  6. Cover and cook for a further 3-4 minutes.
  7. Add the lemon juice, parsley leaves and salt and pepper to taste.

Bon Appetite,

Cherrie

 

Bacon and Egg Slice

There are many versions of bacon and egg slice/pie/tarts out there. This is the one I have made a few times and think it's the best recipe I've found. I like this version as it has whole eggs instead of the egg being used as a binding agent for the bacon and the other ingredients in the filling. The pastry is short and has a nice texture that compliments the filling. And best of all, it's easy to make.

This is perfect eaten hot or cold. You can eat this hot for dinner during the week or can be eaten cold at the park on the weekends.

  • Shortcrust pastry (recipe below)
  • 8 to 9 rashers of rindless bacon, chopped into 5cm lengths
  • 1 medium onion, finely sliced
  • 8 eggs
  • 2 tbs finely chopped parsley
  • 2 large tomatoes, finely sliced
  1. Preheat oven to 220degC. Roll out two-thirds of the pastry and line it in a brownie tin (27cm x 18cm) that has been greased. Trim and rest the pastry while making the filling.
  2. Pan fry the bacon. Remove and and drain on paper towels to cool. Add the onions to the same pan and gently fry till soft and glossy.
  3. Sprinkle the bacon and onions over the pastry base evenly. Break the eggs into the pie and pierce the yolks with a sharp knife. Season with salt and pepper. Scatter the top with parsley and cover with a layer of the tomatoes.
  4. Roll out the remaining pastry and cover the pie. Brush the top with a little egg wash. Make slits in the pastry with a sharp knife to let steam escape.
  5. Bake in the hot oven for 20mins, then reduce the temperature to 200degC and bake for 30mins.

Shortcrust Pastry.

  • 2 cups plain flour
  • good pinch of salt
  • 150g butter, chopped
  • 6 tbs iced water
  • 1 tsp lemon juice

Sift the flour and salt into a bowl and rub in the butter. Add the water and lemon juice and mix well with a fork, then knead lightly with a little extra flour. Cover and rest for 15mins before rolling out.

Bon Appetite,

Cherrie

Kulinarya Cooking Club June 2012: Tapsilog. Breakfast of Champions.

This month’s theme for our Kulinarya Cooking Club is “Only in the Philippines”. Tina from Pinay in Texas Cooking Corner and I are hosting this month and we wanted to focus on unique dishes that can only be found in the Philippines.

Being a Filipina, I love my rice. Growing up, it would be normal for me to have rice three meals in a day. So I thought it natural for me to chose a rice dish for the theme.

I love rice for breakfast. To make a complete meal, add egg and a meat.

What makes this dish unique to the Philippines is the name. Tapsilog. Filipinos like to abbreviate or replace words with acronyms. Tapsilog comprises of Tapa (Tap) sinangag (si) and itlog (log).

Tapa is cured beef. It’s beef that’s been marinated overnight and in some cases, dried then fried. I like my tapa not dried as it can get tough and chewy when not done right. I left out the drying step.

Sinangag is garlic rice. I love it. It’s rice that has been fried with lots of garlic.

Itlog is egg. An oozy, runny egg is essential for this dish.

Recipe:

For the tapa:

  • 700g thinly sliced beef tenderloin. I used sizzling steak
  • 1/2 cup vinegar
  • 3tbs soy sauce
  • 1tbs mushroom or dark soy sauce
  • Pinch salt

Marinate the beef with the rest of the ingredients. Leave overnight or at least 4 hours.

To cook: in a large frying place the beef and marinade in. Let the beef simmer in the marinade until it dries out. Add some vegetable oil to the pan and gently fry until slightly browned and cooked through,

For the sinangag:

  • 3cups of uncooked rice
  • 1bulb of garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
  • Pinch salt

To cook: cook the rice by absorption method. When cooked set aside to cool a bit. You can also use left over rice from the day before. When ready, add a little vegetable oil in a wok and gently fry the garlic till lightly browned. Add the rice and mix thoroughly and add the salt. Turn the heat to low and leave the rice to fry a little and for the garlic to infuse through. Mix every couple of minutes.

Fry the egg to your liking.

Bon appetite,

Cherrie