Yorkshire Brack – Hubby Bakes!

Yorkshire Brack3 OMG! My Hubby baked!  My Hubby is an eater, not a baker. So you can imagine my surprise when he came up with this.  He did a great job and I was so proud of him :) He saw the recipe for Yorkshire brack on “Ade in Britain”, an English cooking show featuring Ade Edmondson.  You’ve would’ve seen him in shows such as “Young ones” and “Bottom”.  He hosted this cooking show which is one of Hubby’s favourites to watch.  Ade travels around Britain learning about local produce and of course, cooking along the way. Yorkshire Brack is a fruit cake with a tea infusion and is usually eaten for afternoon tea with a nice pot of tea but honestly, it can be eaten anytime you like.

Yorkshire Brack2

He decided to make this one day. It’s so easy to make that even a non-baker can make this.  It only has a handful of ingredients and basically everything is thrown into a bowl and mixed together.  The only thing is though, you need to plan ahead as the dried fruit need to soak in tea the night before.  No offense to Hubby, but if he can make this, anyone can. Yorkshire Brack4 I’m not really a fruit cake fan but I have to say, this cake is probably the only one I have enjoyed eating.  It has a treacley, caramely flavour and the sultanas and raisins give it a real sweetness.  You can play with the type of tea you use to give the cake different flavours. Recipe:

  • 150ml of hot tea
  • 454g of mixed dried fruit (sultanas, raisins and currants)
  • 225g self raising flour
  • 175g demerara sugar (can also use raw sugar)
  • 1 egg, beatened
  1. Soak the dried fruit in the hot tea overnight
  2. Next day, Preheat oven to 160degC
  3. Drain the dried fruit into a large bowl and add the rest of the ingredients. Mix well to combine. If mixture is too dry, add another egg and mix.
  4. Spoon the mixture into a prepared loaf tin and bake for approximately for 1 hour or until a skewer comes out clean
  5. Best served warm with butter and a slice of cheese.

Yorkshire Brack5 Bon Appetite, Cherrie

Easter Simnel Cake

The Simnel cake is a cake traditionally baked during Easter in the UK. It's a light fruit cake that has two layers of marzipan, one in the middle and the other on top. The eleven balls of marzipan on top represent the 12 apostles minus Judas (for obvious reasons).

This fruit cake is lighter than the Christmas cake and the marzipan layer in the middle of the cake gives it a unique taste.

My Hubby loves fruit cakes and he has been bugging me for years to bake it for him. I finally caved in and made it for him this year. It got the thumbs up :)

The recipe, I used was Mary Berry's though I did change the number of lemons. I also changed the ratio of the dried fruits though the combined weight is still the same.
  • recipe:
  • 100g glacé cherries, cut into quarters
  • 225g softened butter
  • 225g brown sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 225g self raising flour
  • 375 mixed dried fruit (sultanas, currants, fruit peel)
  • zest of one lemon
  • 2 tsp ground mixed spice
  • 500g marzipan/almond paste
  • 2 tbs apricot jam, warmed in the microwave
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten, to glaze
  1. Preheat oven to 130degC Fan forced. Grease and line a 20cm round cake tin.
  2. Beat the butter and sugar together in a large bowl, until light and creamy. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, to prevent them from curdling. Sift the flour and mix it in a little at a time.
  3. Add the cherries, mixed fruit, mixed spice and the zest and mix until well combined.
  4. Spoon half the mixture into the prepared tin and level the surface.
  5. Take one third of the marzipan and roll it out to a circle the same size as the tin. Place it on top of the cake mixture. Spoon the rest of the cake mixture on top of the marzipan and level the surface.
  6. Bake for 2- 2/12 hours until well risen and equally browned on top. Check after 2 hours. Leave to cool in the tin for about 10mins before turning out onto a cake rack.
  7. When cooled, brush the warm apricot jam over the top of cake and roll out half of the remaining marzipan to fit the top of the cake. Press firmly on the top and crimp the edges. Lightly brush with the beaten egg.
  8. With the remaining marzipan, form eleven balls and arrange the balls around the edge of the cake. Brush the balls with the beaten egg.
  9. Place the cake under a hot grill to turn the marzipan golden-brown. Alternatively, you can use a blow torch,

Happy Easter and Bon Appetite,

Cherrie